Health Programs

Health Programs

The NAACP is committed to eliminating the racial and ethnic disparities in our health care system that plague people of color in the United States. African Americans continue to have the highest incidence, prevalence and mortality rates from chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity. Additionally issues like HIV and infant mortality have continued to overwhelm the Black community. Systemic imbalances in the health care delivery system disproportionately affect African Americans and Latinas more than their White counterparts.
 

The NAACP’s national health agenda includes a four-tiered approach to improving the health and well being of African American families and families of color:
 

           

 

Meet Our Staff:
 

Dr. Marjorie Innocent, Sr. Health Director
Office: (410) 580-5652
minnocent[at]naacpnet.org

Rev. Keron Sadler, Health Programs Manager
Office: (410) 580-5619
ksadler[at]naacpnet.org

Tabatha Magobet, Health Programs Specialist
Office: (410) 580-5682
tmagobet[at]naacpnet.org

Bernadette Onyenaka, Health Programs Specialist
Office: (410) 580-5663
bonyenaka[at]naacpnet.org

Blog Posts

How Do We Get Kids Moving More?

Physical activity is not just good for the body. How can we better support communities in making physical activity an everyday occurrence for all children and youth?

Be Part of the Conversation on #MoveEquity

Low-income people and people of color are more likely to walk or bicycle than people in more affluent communities, but low-income communities are less likely to have infrastructure that makes it safe and convenient to bike and walk - such as sidewalks, bike paths, street lighting, and crosswalks.

This National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, Speak Up to Inspire Change

Every year on March 10, we recognize National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWGHAAD) across the nation as a day to raise awareness of the unique impact of HIV on women and girls, and the prevention and care resources available to them.

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

The African American community bears the largest burden of the HIV epidemic over any other racial or ethnic group in the United States. Despite representing just 13% of the total U.S. population, African Americans account for almost half (44%) of all new HIV infections, and comprise nearly half (43%) of all people living with HIV