Health Programs

Health Programs

The NAACP is committed to eliminating the racial and ethnic disparities in our health care system that plague people of color in the United States. African Americans continue to have the highest incidence, prevalence and mortality rates from chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity. Additionally issues like HIV and infant mortality have continued to overwhelm the Black community. Systemic imbalances in the health care delivery system disproportionately affect African Americans and Latinas more than their White counterparts.
 

The NAACP’s national health agenda includes a four-tiered approach to improving the health and well being of African American families and families of color:
 

           

 

Meet Our Staff:
 

Dr. Marjorie Innocent, Sr. Health Director
Office: (410) 580-5652
minnocent[at]naacpnet.org

Rev. Keron Sadler, Health Programs Manager
Office: (410) 580-5619
ksadler[at]naacpnet.org

Tabatha Magobet, Health Programs Specialist
Office: (410) 580-5682
tmagobet[at]naacpnet.org

Bernadette Onyenaka, Health Programs Specialist
Office: (410) 580-5663
bonyenaka[at]naacpnet.org

Blog Posts

Our Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Commitment to Action

This week, September 19 -21, is the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) 2016 Annual Meeting - a conference that brings leaders and members together from across the world to translate good ideas into real results on the ground.

Health Policy 101 Webinar - October 4, 2016

The NAACP, the National Urban League, and The Food Trust announce a collaborative training and technical assistance webinar series!

Increasing Physical Activity for All Kids:  What We’ve Learned

What can we do to make physical activity a part of all kids' everyday experience?

Love First: The Need for a Renewed Focus in the Black Church

The mission of The Black Church and HIV: The Social Justice Imperative initiative is not to change what people believe. It is to reframe the HIV epidemic as a social justice issue, because current HIV disparities are the result of social inequities in American society and health care that affect individual behaviors and outcomes.